Problem: Light with intensity I0 = 300 W/m2 passes through two ideal polarizing filters, which are oriented as shown in the figure. The angle of the first polarizer is fixed, while the angle Φ of the second filter is adjustable. a) If the initial light is unpolarized, what value of  Φ will make the intensity at point P equal to 100 W/m2? Φ = _______________   b) Assuming the same conditions as in part (a), what are the maximum electric and magnetic field values at point P? (ε0 = 8.854 x 10-12 C2 / (N•m2)) Emax = _______________ Bmax = _______________   c) Now assume the inital light is linearly polarized in the same direction as the polarizing axis of the first polarizer. If Φ is fixed at the angle found in part (a), what will the intensity at point  P be? I = _______________  

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Problem Details

Light with intensity I= 300 W/m2 passes through two ideal polarizing filters, which are oriented as shown in the figure. The angle of the first polarizer is fixed, while the angle Φ of the second filter is adjustable.

a) If the initial light is unpolarized, what value of  Φ will make the intensity at point P equal to 100 W/m2?

Φ = _______________

b) Assuming the same conditions as in part (a), what are the maximum electric and magnetic field values at point P? (ε0 = 8.854 x 10-12 C/ (N•m2))

Emax_______________

Bmax_______________

c) Now assume the inital light is linearly polarized in the same direction as the polarizing axis of the first polarizer. If Φ is fixed at the angle found in part (a), what will the intensity at point  P be?

I _______________

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Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Polarization Filters concept. You can view video lessons to learn Polarization Filters. Or if you need more Polarization Filters practice, you can also practice Polarization Filters practice problems.

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Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Ford's class at TAMU.