Problem: Two ice skaters, Daniel (mass 70.0 kg) and Rebecca (mass 45.0 kg), are practicing. Daniel stops to tie his shoelace and, while at rest, is struck by Rebecca, who is moving at 14.0 m/s before she collides with him. After the collision, Rebecca has a velocity of magnitude 8.00 m/s at an angle of 54.1° from her initial direction. Both skaters move on the frictionless, horizontal surface of the rink.(a) What is the magnitude of Daniels velocity after the collision?(b) What is the direction of Daniels velocity after the collision?(c) What is the change in total kinetic energy of the two skaters as a result of the collision?

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Two ice skaters, Daniel (mass 70.0 kg) and Rebecca (mass 45.0 kg), are practicing. Daniel stops to tie his shoelace and, while at rest, is struck by Rebecca, who is moving at 14.0 m/s before she collides with him. After the collision, Rebecca has a velocity of magnitude 8.00 m/s at an angle of 54.1° from her initial direction. Both skaters move on the frictionless, horizontal surface of the rink.
(a) What is the magnitude of Daniels velocity after the collision?
(b) What is the direction of Daniels velocity after the collision?
(c) What is the change in total kinetic energy of the two skaters as a result of the collision?

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Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Schulte's class at UCF.