Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: For the following solute–solvent combinations, state the sign and relative magnitudes for ΔH1, ΔH2, ΔH3, and ΔHsoln (as defined in Fig. 10‑1 of the text). Explain your answers.Fig. 10-1

Solution: For the following solute–solvent combinations, state the sign and relative magnitudes for ΔH1, ΔH2, ΔH3, and ΔHsoln (as defined in Fig. 10‑1 of the text). Explain your answers.Fig. 10-1

Problem

For the following solute–solvent combinations, state the sign and relative magnitudes for ΔH1, ΔH2, ΔH3, and ΔHsoln (as defined in Fig. 10‑1 of the text). Explain your answers.

Fig. 10-1

Solution

First, we look at the expansion of the solvent and solute. The enthalpy change (ΔH1 and ΔH2) must be greater than zero because they need to absorb energy (endothermic) in order to overcome the intermolecular forces that bind those compounds together. 

Also, it is important to note that the solute went from a more ordered/tightly packed structure than the solvent. This means that it would require more energy to change it to the expanded form. 

So the relative magnitudes and charges are: 

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