Problem: Molecular nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ion are isoelectronic. CO and CN − are toxic. What property may explain why N2 isn’t?

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Luong's class at University of Manitoba.

FREE Expert Solution

Isoelectronic molecules/ions have an equal number of electrons. We can start by writing the Lewis structures of CO, CN- and N2.


Let’s calculate the number of valence electrons first.


https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/S4dCNiYXVWvMcXs4l7G3MRKn91DyeTGeXBsdI_A_AK8ZUASvkeVw9NFavS8dpnJe7ZLGlxhHyllAIvLIS1W-D-7YlfeA4KiHsSzXalfnKBSA2rYKjuqln9YYpF6a3JIpbBf9ctaA

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Problem Details

Molecular nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ion are isoelectronic. CO and CN  are toxic. What property may explain why N2 isn’t?

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules concept. You can view video lessons to learn Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules. Or if you need more Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules practice, you can also practice Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Luong's class at University of Manitoba.

What textbook is this problem found in?

Our data indicates that this problem or a close variation was asked in Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Silberberg 8th Edition. You can also practice Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Silberberg 8th Edition practice problems.