Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Explain how doping silicon with either phosphorus or gallium increases the electrical conductivity over that of pure silicon.

Solution: Explain how doping silicon with either phosphorus or gallium increases the electrical conductivity over that of pure silicon.

Problem

Explain how doping silicon with either phosphorus or gallium increases the electrical conductivity over that of pure silicon.

Solution

Silicon is a Group 4A element. It has 4 valence electrons. Pure silicon will use these 4 electrons to form a network with other silicon atoms as shown below:

All the electrons of Si are paired (through more networks of Si atoms). Hence, it is not very conductive at its pure state.

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