Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium WorksheetSee all chapters
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Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: A 1.0L buffer solution contains 0.100 mol of HC2H3O2 and 0.100 mol of NaC2H3O. The value of Ka for HC2H3O2  is 1.8×10−5. Calculate the pH of the solution upon the addition of 0.015 mol of NaOH to the original buffer.

Problem

A 1.0L buffer solution contains 0.100 mol of HC2H3O2 and 0.100 mol of NaC2H3O. The value of Ka for HC2H3O2  is 1.8×10−5. Calculate the pH of the solution upon the addition of 0.015 mol of NaOH to the original buffer.

Solution

Determine the pH of the buffer upon addition of strong base using an ICF table and Henderson-Hasselbalch equation.

Step 1. Establish the ICF table

  • HC2H3O2 will appear as the weak acid and C2H3O2-(NaC2H3O2) as its conjugate base
  • Upon addition of the strong base, OH- will consume some of the HC2H3Oto form more C2H3O2-
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