Ch.19 - Nuclear ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Using 21st-century technology, hydrogen fusion requires temperatures around 108 K. But, lower initial temperatures are used if the hydrogen is compressed. In the late 24th century, the starship Leinad

Problem

Using 21st-century technology, hydrogen fusion requires temperatures around 108 K. But, lower initial temperatures are used if the hydrogen is compressed. In the late 24th century, the starship Leinad uses such methods to fuse hydrogen at 106 K.

(a) What is the kinetic energy of an H atom at 1.00×106 K?
(b) How many H atoms are heated to 1.00×106 K from the energy of one H and one anti-H atom annihilating each other? 

(c) If the heated H atoms of part (b) fuse into 4He atoms (with the loss of two positrons per 4He formed), how much energy (in J) is generated?

(d) How much more energy is generated by the fusion in part (c) than by the hydrogen-antihydrogen collision in part (b)?


(e) Should the captain of the Leinad change the technology and produce 3He (mass = 3.01603 amu) instead of 4He?