Ch.19 - Nuclear ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Charcoal samples from Stonehenge in England were burned in O2, and the resultant CO2 gas bubbled into a solution of Ca(OH)2 (limewater), resulting in the precipitation of CaCO3. The CaCO3 was removed

Problem

Charcoal samples from Stonehenge in England were burned in O2, and the resultant CO2 gas bubbled into a solution of Ca(OH)2 (limewater), resulting in the precipitation of CaCO3. The CaCO3 was removed by filtration and dried. A 791 -mg sample of the CaCO3 had a radioactivity of 1.6×10−2 Bq because of carbon-14. By comparison, living organisms undergo 15.3 disintegrations per minute per gram of carbon.

Using the half-life of carbon-14,5700 yr, calculate the age of the charcoal sample.