Ch.19 - Nuclear ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Decay of a 10.0-g sample of strontium-90 (t1/2 = 28.8 yr).The 10 imes 10 grids show how much of the radioactive isotope remains aftervarious amounts of time.If we start with a 50.0-g sample, how m

Problem

The x-axis is time (year) ranging from 0 to 120 with intervals of 20. The y-axis is mass of strontium-90 (grams), ranging from 0 to 10.0 with intervals of 2.0. The data are described as follows; values are approximate. For a time of 0 years, the mass is 10.0 grams, and the portion of the 10 by 10 grid remaining is 100 percent. At 29 years, the mass is 5.0 grams with 50 percent remaining. At 58 years, the mass is 2.4 grams, with 25 percent remaining. At 85 years, the mass is 1.3 grams, and the percentage remaining is 12.
Decay of a 10.0-g sample of strontium-90 (t1/2 = 28.8 yr).The 10 10 grids show how much of the radioactive isotope remains aftervarious amounts of time.

If we start with a 50.0-g sample, how much of it remains after three half-lives have passed?