All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Expansion of a gas into an evacuated space is a spontaneous process. The reverse process-gas molecules initially distributed evenly in two flasks all moving into one flask-is not spontaneous.If flask B were smaller than flask A, would the final pressure after the stopcock is opened be greater than, equal to, or less than 0.5 atm?

Solution: Expansion of a gas into an evacuated space is a spontaneous process. The reverse process-gas molecules initially distributed evenly in two flasks all moving into one flask-is not spontaneous.If flask

Problem

A diagram shows two flasks, connected by a closed stopcock.  Flask A on the left has gas at 1 atmosphere, while flask B on the right is an evacuated flask at 0 atmospheres. When the stopcock opens, the gas expands to occupy both flasks.  Both flasks A and B now have 0.5 atmospheres of pressure; this process is spontaneous. A third diagram shows the stopcock still open, but all gas molecules have moved back into flask A. This process is not spontaneous.
Expansion of a gas into an evacuated space is a spontaneous process. The reverse process-gas molecules initially distributed evenly in two flasks all moving into one flask-is not spontaneous.

If flask B were smaller than flask A, would the final pressure after the stopcock is opened be greater than, equal to, or less than 0.5 atm?

Solution

We are given the following figure:

A diagram shows two flasks, connected by a closed stopcock.  Flask A on the left has gas at 1 atmosphere, while flask B on the right is an evacuated flask at 0 atmospheres. When the stopcock opens, the gas expands to occupy both flasks.  Both flasks A and B now have 0.5 atmospheres of pressure; this process is spontaneous. A third diagram shows the stopcock still open, but all gas molecules have moved back into flask A. This process is not spontaneous.


We are asked if flask B were smaller than flask A, would the final pressure after the stopcock is opened be greater than, equal to, or less than 0.5 atm.

Recall that the ideal gas law is:


PV=nRT


The pressure and volume of a gas are related to the number of moles, gas constant and temperatureThe value nRT is constant


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