Ch.13 - Chemical KineticsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution:
Sucrose (C12 H22 O11 ), which is commonly known as table sugar, reacts in dilute acid solutions to form two simpler sugars, glucose and fructose, both of which have the formula C6 H12 O6. At 23 oC and in 0.5 M  HCl, the following data were obtained for the disappearance of sucrose:

Time  (minC12H22O11 (M)
00.316
390.274
800.238
1400.190
2100.146

What is the rate constant?

Solution: Sucrose (C12 H22 O11 ), which is commonly known as table sugar, reacts in dilute acid solutions to form two simpler sugars, glucose and fructose, both of which have the formula C6 H12 O6. At 23 oC and

Problem
Sucrose (C12 H22 O11 ), which is commonly known as table sugar, reacts in dilute acid solutions to form two simpler sugars, glucose and fructose, both of which have the formula C6 H12 O6. At 23 oC and in 0.5 M  HCl, the following data were obtained for the disappearance of sucrose:


Time  (minC12H22O11 (M)
00.316
390.274
800.238
1400.190
2100.146


What is the rate constant?