Problem: We have seen a number of reactions in which a single reactant forms products. For example, consider the following first-order reaction: CH3NC(g) → CH3CN(g). However, we also learned that gas-phase reactions occur through collisions.Another possibility is that the reaction occurs through more than one step. For example, a possible mechanism involves one step in which the two CH3NC molecules collide, resulting in the "activation" of one of them. In a second step, the activated molecule goes on to form the product. Determine which step must be rate determining in order for the kinetics of the reaction to be first order.

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We have seen a number of reactions in which a single reactant forms products. For example, consider the following first-order reaction: CH3NC(g) → CH3CN(g). However, we also learned that gas-phase reactions occur through collisions.

Another possibility is that the reaction occurs through more than one step. For example, a possible mechanism involves one step in which the two CH3NC molecules collide, resulting in the "activation" of one of them. In a second step, the activated molecule goes on to form the product. Determine which step must be rate determining in order for the kinetics of the reaction to be first order.

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