Ch.13 - Chemical KineticsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Consider the following reaction: 2 H2O2(aq) → 2 H2O(l) + O2(g). The graph shows the concentration of H2O2 as a function of time. Use the graph to calculate the following.
A graph of time, in seconds, versus concentration of hydrogen peroxide, in molars. The graph resembles an exponential decay, with an initial concentration of one molar. At ten seconds, the concentration is approximately point seven five molar. At twenty seconds, the concentration is approximately point five five molar. From thirty to fifty seconds, the concentration decreases linearly with a concentration of point four molar at thirty seconds, and a concentration of approximately point two molar at fifty seconds.
The average rate of the reaction between 10 and 20 s.

Solution: Consider the following reaction: 2 H2O2(aq) → 2 H2O(l) + O2(g). The graph shows the concentration of H2O2 as a function of time. Use the graph to calculate the following.The average rate of the reacti

Problem

Consider the following reaction: 2 H2O2(aq) → 2 H2O(l) + O2(g). The graph shows the concentration of H2O2 as a function of time. Use the graph to calculate the following.
A graph of time, in seconds, versus concentration of hydrogen peroxide, in molars. The graph resembles an exponential decay, with an initial concentration of one molar. At ten seconds, the concentration is approximately point seven five molar. At twenty seconds, the concentration is approximately point five five molar. From thirty to fifty seconds, the concentration decreases linearly with a concentration of point four molar at thirty seconds, and a concentration of approximately point two molar at fifty seconds.

The average rate of the reaction between 10 and 20 s.