Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The "free-base" form of cocaine (C17H21NO4) and its protonated hydrochloride form (C17H22ClNO4) are shown below; the free-base form can be converted to the hydrochloride form with one equivalent of HCl. For clarity, not all the carbon and hydrogen atoms are shown; each vertex represents a carbon atom with the appropriate number of hydrogen atoms so that each carbon makes four bonds to other atoms. Cocaine is a seven membered ring with carbon as all of its vertices and both the upper left and lower left vertices single bonded to the same N; that N is single bonded to CH3. The upper right vertex is single bonded to COOCH3, and the right point is single bonded to an O that is single bonded to a CO attached to the lower left vertex of a benzene ring with its points arranged vertically. Cocaine is added to HCl to produce cocaine hydrochloride. Cocaine hydrochloride has the same structure as cocaine, except the N attached to the seven-membered ring is now N+ and is also single bonded to the H from HCl. Cl- is nearby. How many mL of a concentrated 18.6 MHCl aqueous solution would it take to convert 1.00 kilograms (a "kilo") of the free-base form of cocaine into its hydrochloride form?

Solution: The "free-base" form of cocaine (C17H21NO4) and its protonated hydrochloride form (C17H22ClNO4) are shown below; the free-base form can be converted to the hydrochloride form with one equivalent of HC

Problem

The "free-base" form of cocaine (C17H21NO4) and its protonated hydrochloride form (C17H22ClNO4) are shown below; the free-base form can be converted to the hydrochloride form with one equivalent of HCl. For clarity, not all the carbon and hydrogen atoms are shown; each vertex represents a carbon atom with the appropriate number of hydrogen atoms so that each carbon makes four bonds to other atoms.

Cocaine is a seven membered ring with carbon as all of its vertices and both the upper left and lower left vertices single bonded to the same N; that N is single bonded to CH3. The upper right vertex is single bonded to COOCH3, and the right point is single bonded to an O that is single bonded to a CO attached to the lower left vertex of a benzene ring with its points arranged vertically. Cocaine is added to HCl to produce cocaine hydrochloride. Cocaine hydrochloride has the same structure as cocaine, except the N attached to the seven-membered ring is now N+ and is also single bonded to the H from HCl. Cl- is nearby.

How many mL of a concentrated 18.6 MHCl aqueous solution would it take to convert 1.00 kilograms (a "kilo") of the free-base form of cocaine into its hydrochloride form?