Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular StructureWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds
Sections
Chemical Bonds
Lattice Energy
Lattice Energy Application
Born Haber Cycle
Dipole Moment
Lewis Dot Structure
Octet Rule
Formal Charge
Resonance Structures
Additional Practice
Bond Energy

Solution: Two different compounds have the formula XeF2Cl2. Write Lewis structures for these two compounds, and describe how measurement of dipole moments might be used to distinguish between them.

Solution: Two different compounds have the formula XeF2Cl2. Write Lewis structures for these two compounds, and describe how measurement of dipole moments might be used to distinguish between them.

Problem

Two different compounds have the formula XeF2Cl2. Write Lewis structures for these two compounds, and describe how measurement of dipole moments might be used to distinguish between them.

Solution

Xenon (EN = 2.60) is less electronegative than fluorine (EN = 3.98) and chlorine (EN = 3.16) so xenon is the central atom. We then need to count the total number of valence electrons for each element:

Fluorine and chlorine prefers to form 1 bond. There are two possible Lewis structures for this compound:

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