Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular StructureWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds
Sections
Chemical Bonds
Lattice Energy
Lattice Energy Application
Born Haber Cycle
Dipole Moment
Lewis Dot Structure
Octet Rule
Formal Charge
Resonance Structures
Additional Practice
Bond Energy

Solution:
There are two compounds of the formula Pt(NH3 )2 Cl2 as shown below. The compound on the right is called cisplatin, and the compound on the left is called transplatin.Which compound has a nonzero dipole moment?

Solution: There are two compounds of the formula Pt(NH3 )2 Cl2 as shown below. The compound on the right is called cisplatin, and the compound on the left is called transplatin.Which compound has a nonzero dipo

Problem

There are two compounds of the formula Pt(NH3 )2 Cl2 as shown below. The compound on the right is called cisplatin, and the compound on the left is called transplatin.

The first structure is a central Pt single bonded below to NH3, right to Cl, left to Cl, and above to NH3.  In the second, Pt is single bonded below and right to NH3 and left and above to Cl.

Which compound has a nonzero dipole moment?

Solution

There are two possible Lewis structures for Pt(NH3)2Cl2:

Platinum (EN = 2.28) is less electronegative than nitrogen (EN = 3.04) and chlorine (EN = 3.16) so the dipole moments point away from Pt.

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