Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond TheoryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: In a trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, there are two types of positions for the outer atoms.What is the bond angle formed by an axial atom, the central atom, and any equatorial atom?

Problem

A central atom is connected horizontally to three equatorial positions, forming an equilateral triangle, and two axial positions, perpendicularly above and below the equatorial positions.

In a trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, there are two types of positions for the outer atoms.

What is the bond angle formed by an axial atom, the central atom, and any equatorial atom?

Solution

We’re being asked to determine the bond angle formed by an axial atom, the central atom, and any equatorial atom.

The trigonal bipyramidal geometry is a molecular geometry with one atom at the center and 5 more atoms at the corners of a triangular bipyramid. 


It has two distinct types of position for the other atoms

  • an axial position 
    • if we hold a model of a trigonal bipyramid by the two axial positions, we have an axis around which we can rotate the model
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